Category Archives: Puppy Training

Puppy Socialisation

What is Socialisation?

Socialisation is a broad term used to describe mentally and physically preparing your pup for the world around them.

These imporatant skills are developed in the first few months of your dogs life and will last it’s lifetime.

Puppies that are socialized well are less prone to reacting badly to noises, other dogs or other people.

A well socialised puppy is more likely to integrate into human life easier starting your lifetime together on the right path.

Socialization is divided into to parts. The first part of socialization is teaching our pups to be well mannered around other dogs and people. The second part is referred to as habituation which is teaching our pups that situations and noises are not scary (traffic, cars, buses, etc).

Sadly, a lot of people do not understand the importance of this stage in a puppies life. This results in behavioural problems in adolescent and adult dogs (the majority being fear based issues). This is the most common call we get- a dog fearful of other dogs, strangers or new situations.  The first 16 weeks of a pups life are so important in preparing your puppy for the rest of its life.

Some breeds are referred to as “reactive breeds” and it is in their nature to be more guarding of their owners or property (terriers are a perfect example of this). It is especially important for dogs like this to be socialised and habituated as soon as possible.

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Good Breeders

It is the job of a good breeder to start puppies out on the right track with socialisation.  Breeders establish the foundations for a puppy’s social skills, learning skills and problem solving abilities.

Breeders handle puppies from birth ensuring they are used to human touch. Introducing a puppy to a variety of different noises, surfaces, toys and textures contribute to a puppies early development.

In addition to asking your breeder about your new pups health checks, make sure you ask what efforts have been made to socialise the puppies so far so you can continue the good work.

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The Fear Stage

From 5 weeks old to approx 16 weeks, our puppies go through a transition where a puppies fearfulness starts to increase. It is vitally important that pups are socialised and habituated with as many things as possible during this stage and making all experiences as positive as possible.

Getting out and about with your puppy is key to them excepting everyday things like traffic or farm animals. Also think about your lifestyle. If you live in the City, taking your dog to see horses is not the most obvious choice. But exposing your puppy to traffic, police sirens, subways, etc would be a more constructive use of your time (and vice versa).

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Puppy Parties or Group Socials

Use resources such at www.meetup.com, facebook etc to meet other puppies in your local area. Many trainers (including us) offer socialisation walks which are perfect for puppies to make new friends and learn to play appropriately. Having a dog trainer or behaviourist on hand is a nice way of learning what is appropriate and isn’t appropriate in your pups play style.

 

Hope that gives you a nice introduction to the importance of socializing your puppy. If you have any questions, please contact us at any time

The Importance of Socialization

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The experiences of young puppies affects their brain development which in turn influences their behaviour as they become adult dogs. Socialization is where a puppy learns to recognise and respond to the environment it lives in and stimulus it comes across (other people, other dogs). cialis pillendienst buy sildenafil citrate online india cialis for sale

The socialization period (3-12 weeks of age) is critical in shaping your dogs adult behaviour and should not be ignored. cialis pills 10 mg confezioni viagra 100 mg viagra online

Behavioural problems associated to lack of early socialization are difficult to reverse and can lead to fear, aggression and anxiety.

From 3  to 8 weeks of age, your pup should have been socialized by the breeder or rescue group. This includes socializing with people, children and being exposed to new environments and surfaces. This is usually when a puppy will be exposed to new surfaces, different rooms of the house, vets visits, meeting the family and other pets. When your puppy comes home to you between 8-12 weeks, you must build on this basic socialization foundation and continue to expose your pup to new people, places and other animals.

Training and Behaviour 

Signing up to puppy socialization classes and training classes will help immensely in pointing your pup in the right direction. where can i buy viagra

You can start training your puppy at any age, but remember to keep training sessions short to avoid your puppy getting over tired or bored. If you do each session as long as a commercial break, you should be fine.

Training classes are not only important in helping build trust between you and your dog, but they are also a great way of socializing your pup in a controlled environment. does cialis generic work same cheap viagra price viagra cialis levitra

Socializing a Puppy

Some people don’t give their pups the right amount of socialization because they are worried about them catching a disease. However, what we can do as pet owners is balance the need for socialization with the risk of disease. By controlling the conditions, you are minimizing risk.

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Jester was carried about in a bag so he could experience  life with minimal risk

Our job as pup owners is to expose our pup to as many different experiences as possible to ensure that as our dog grows, they are happy in their new surroundings.

Low risk experiences you can try with your pup

  • Carrying your puppy out and about with you
  • Introducing your puppy to public transport (buses, trains)
  • Visiting friends and family
  • Getting your pup used to busy areas
  • Car and cab journeys
  • Inviting visitors with fully vaccinated dogs to your house

Constantly reinforcing positive experiences is important for behavioural development as your pup continues to adulthood.

Exposing a puppy from a young age to the sights and sounds of human life lessons the risk of fear of noises or vehicles (such as buses ). Having a dog that is used to other dogs and people from a young age makes life so much easier.

Do you need to train your dog?

Training a dog is a great way to keep your dog’s mind active and busy. It is also a great way to build up a bond and understanding of your dog in every day life.

Training is a great way to teach your dog how to cope within the human world and understand the rules of what is expected of them (no jumping, walk nicely on lead, etc)

Dogs (and humans) find it easier to learn when it is fun. Dogs learn through actions and behaviours so it is important to show your dog clearly what you want of them. Remember that it is easier to train your dog to do it correctly from the start than untrain “naughty” behaviour afterwards

Mental and Physical training are both important when raising a happy and healthy dog.

Mental Stimulation can take the form of formal training, trick training and using boredom buster toys such as food distributing treat balls, Kongs and Busy Buddy Twist and Treat to have your pet work for their food and treats. Mental stimulation involves the dog having to work things out with their mind.

Creative Commons
Creative Commons

Physical training involves on or off lead walks, games of fetch, fly ball and agility. Anything that physically tires your dog is a form of training also. Us your daily walks to encourage good on lead walking, eye contact and impulse control. Dogs no matter the age can learn something new

A hairless Chinese Crested taking part in an agility competition. Creative Commons
A hairless Chinese Crested taking part in an agility competition.
Creative Commons

Every Day Checklist

 

  • Teach your dog basic commands by joining a training class
  • Regularly use boredom buster toys to give your dog a mental workout
  • Make sure your dog has daily walks and practising good manners

 

 

Crate Training Tips

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Crate training is a great way to keep your house and new puppy safe in it’s home. It is also an essential tool for house training and building up bladder control.

It takes puppies and dogs a little while to get used to crate training but using “boredom buster toys” and treats help ease the process.

Introducing the Crate

Think of the crate as a studio apartment for your puppy. A studio apartment can be the worst place in the world if you have nothing to do in it. However, the same space filled with a flat screen tv, wifi, video games and pizza arriving every hour suddenly becomes the best place in the entire world! Now our job as “real estate” agents for crates is to make the space as appealing to our K9 clients as possible. We can use our dogs food, boredom buster toys and chew toys to make the crate a fun place to be check my source.

Make the Crate a Palace

Start off by feeding your dog in the crate without locking the door. Start creating positive associations with the crate. If every meal and fun treat comes from inside the crate, Fido is going to start loving the idea of going in there. We love using food stuffed Kongs, bully sticks and flossies with our dogs undergoing crate training.

Don’t Isolate your Dog

A lot of people will make the mistake of setting up a crate in the corner of a room or in a closed bedroom (away from the family)and be surprised when Fido fusses. Start off having the crate next to you while you are watching TV, at your desk and next to your bed. Once Fido loves the crate at that proximity, start building up more and more distance.

Build Up Muscle

Think of “crate training” as being similar to “weight training”. Just like you are not going to be able to lift a 100lb weight on your first attempt, your puppy will not be able to tolerate 5 hours in the crate first time. However if you practice often, slowly and within your dogs comfort zone you will make fast progress and your dog will start to love being in his crate.

Ignore Barking

If your dog barks, whines or scratches to get out, you have to ignore it. If you pay attention to these behaviors and let your pup out all you are doing is teaching Fido that barking, whining and scratching gets him out of the crate! You need to reduce the amount of time spent in the crate next time and make a mental note to not push your pup for as long when practicing.
Always make the crate a positive place and avoid using it for punishment. Keep your expectations realistic and reward your dog when they have done a good job.